Beatboxing Rajasthani Villager Video

by Sharell शारेल on March 8, 2013

in Snapshots of India, Travel in India

For most of the week, I’ve been in the Pali district of Rajasthan to see and experience the inspiring rural tourism development initiatives of Culture Aangan.

During the evening, the hosts of the homestay where I was staying organised a group of local villagers to come and perform bhajans (Hindu devotional songs). However, one of them had an unexpected extra talent that he was delighted to demonstrate.

There are so many weird and wonderful things to discover in India’s villages, and he was definitely one of them!

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{ 34 comments… read them below or add one }

Melanie March 8, 2013 at 2:46 pm

Loved it! Loved him!

Just wondering, we may have to change this saying “if it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it MUST be a Rajasthani Villager???

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Sharell शारेल March 8, 2013 at 4:36 pm

Bwahahahah, yes I think so!

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Padparadscha March 8, 2013 at 7:08 pm

You really have an interesting job, Sharell :)

Culture Aangan seems very inspiring, are they some kind of fair trade tourist agency ?

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Sharell शारेल March 8, 2013 at 7:37 pm

I guess you could call them that. A friend of mine started the organisation. She has developed homestays in two rural areas, in conjunction with locals, that are of “western quality” in terms of comfort and facilities. While there, tourists can partake in a range of activities that give them exposure to the rural way of life, and also benefit the villagers who receive income from it.

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Shalu Sharma March 9, 2013 at 2:49 am

Watched the video. What can I say? I wonder where he learnt it and what the noise was all about? Don’t you just love India and Indians?
I have always loved the villages; when we were children, every summer holidays we used to visit the villages to our grandparents. Sometimes, I just wonder where the time has all gone!

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Sharell शारेल March 9, 2013 at 8:25 am

The guy is one of India’s treasures. You just never know what people can do — always expect the unexpected! It’s fabulous. Spending time in villages reminds me why I love India.

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2 Neighbours March 13, 2013 at 4:42 pm

lol, sharell treasure of India? Jyada ho gya lol. Aisa lag raha hai, he’s drunk.

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Sharell शारेल March 13, 2013 at 6:54 pm

Dare I say high on opium as well. But that doesn’t matter! Still… kyaa talent hai!!

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Miss Footloose | Life in the Expat Lane March 9, 2013 at 2:55 am

Great fun! It’s the sort of thing I love about my own expat life in various countries — all those events, happenings and customs you’d never experience if you stayed at home.

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Sharell शारेल March 9, 2013 at 8:35 am

Absolutely. There’s never a dull moment. People sometimes wonder if I’ll get bored of India — NEVER!

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ASG March 9, 2013 at 10:53 am

Hi Sharrrel,

His masculine dancing style reminds of Haryana’s village folk dancing and singing called “Ragini” pronounced as “Raagni”. Basically performed by men, it has combines rugged masculine and feminine hand movements. Funnily, every song has the same rhythm.

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Jonathan March 9, 2013 at 11:16 am

Hahaha that’s super funny! I’m always amazed at how comfortable Indian people are with singing and dancing in public, and how eager they are to see you the same. Any hidden talent you shared with them haha?

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Sharell शारेल March 9, 2013 at 12:45 pm

Yeah, my bhangra dancing. ;-)

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charie March 9, 2013 at 3:31 pm

Wow, and people say hip hop started in urban America. Not so.

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Subhasmita March 9, 2013 at 9:28 pm

Hia Sharell that is hilarious don’t you just love his simplicity?
Well why don’t you come to gujarat once and visit all the places? do visit kutch and gir in the jungle safari and diu(a better version of goa) and belated happy women’s day:)

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Manny March 9, 2013 at 10:55 pm

Not sure, if the desi folks singers here are from Rajastan.

http://youtu.be/EskBsvN5tDU

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Cathy March 10, 2013 at 8:49 am

I wonder if he does party

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Sharell शारेल March 10, 2013 at 9:48 am

There’s plenty of opium in the villages!

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vinod March 10, 2013 at 10:10 am

And Bhang or Even Ganja (weed)
When i was growing up as a child, in Pathankot which is like the foothills of Himalayas, I would see cannabis growing as weed on the sides of the railway track.
It was a curious sight to see Sadhus, plucking its leave and crushing it between their palms.
Thats probably how it got that name ‘weed’. Dang it was a weed.

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Sharell शारेल March 10, 2013 at 11:04 am

It grows wild in Manali too. Some plants were as tall as me!!!

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Sharell शारेल March 10, 2013 at 11:09 am

Check this out. A blast from the past six years ago. Too bad I’m not a smoker!

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vinod March 10, 2013 at 11:47 am

yeah thats how it was….train track going from Pathankot station to Jammu Tawi station.

my regret that I was a boy.

I actually first had my taste of Bhang at Rajasthan. It was sold at Government licensed shops.

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Sharell शारेल March 10, 2013 at 1:50 pm

There’s a government licensed shop in Jaisalmer. I tried some there.

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vinod March 11, 2013 at 12:04 am

I once tried in a shop near Udaipur at Rajsamndh district. it was weird experience and kick. Since its eaten, it takes long time to get absorbed in the blood stream and show its effect.

I was like …nothing happened.

And once back to the bachelors hostel of the township, was flying on my bed….broke it.

Second time, mess cook had made dhandai drink in the hostel mess along with evening snacks. he claimed that its of low dosage. And I drank it…..dang the TV was shaking and one of the friend had to take me to the room.

Weed was similar but it affected fast and was not as concentrated as bhang!

Now I know why all these Sadhus run towards Himalayas to seek truth and salvation. ……weed …Baamb baam bholey. Om namaa Sivayah.

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ASG March 11, 2013 at 10:15 am

Talking of bhaang, yesterday was Shivratri. Lord Shiva is associated with intoxicants. Dhattura a kind of intoxiant herb is offered to Lord Siva during Shivratri. Though I strongly doubt whether Shiva subscribed to getting high on drugs. People misuse his name to indulge in obnoxious activities.

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vinod March 11, 2013 at 11:36 am

I have an Idea.
Lets meet Shiva and ask him.
But the only way to meet him is to take a dose of bhang and get into trance.
If you are addicted to Bhang or Ganja, its an issue.
Once in a way is kinda ok!

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vinod March 10, 2013 at 11:52 am

And first time I smoked weed was as a student at Bharthidasan Management Institute. It was very near to Regional Engineering college – Trichy. One Bengali senior got it from there.

Never crossed path with weed in Bhang form or for smoke. You know that Bhang is resin obtained from cannabis leaves.

Rajasthan also has strong tradition of drinking Opium at social rituals. Opium is from Poppy plant. I wonder if i can do indoor farming of Poppy, I do have poppy seeds (Khas Khas) in my kitchen! Does one get high by eating poppy seeds?

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Padparadscha March 10, 2013 at 7:43 pm

I guess it depends on people… I get high on Asafoetida and Cardamom :)

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Manny March 12, 2013 at 3:51 am

That’s an awesome Photo. Luv it! Ha Ha!

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Cathy March 10, 2013 at 12:45 pm

Wow! That is crazy it grows wild there

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Makk March 11, 2013 at 7:16 pm

Where exactly in Pali?

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Sharell शारेल March 11, 2013 at 9:03 pm

Padampura village. I’ll be writing more about it soon.

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ASG March 12, 2013 at 9:53 am

Since holy is round the corner, practice getting high on some bhaang.

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Ramanan March 13, 2013 at 7:22 pm

WOW….That was freaking weird.,I mean the “dance”

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